Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential, medication assistant, On the Job, Professional Identity

Levels of Medical Assisting

Here is an interesting question about “levels” of medical assisting:

I work for a very large cardiology practice in North Carolina. Is it permissible to establish tiers of medical assistants based on their skill sets? For example, are we permitted under North Carolina law to have categories such as Medical Assistant I, Medical Assistant II, Medical Assistant III based on the medical assistant’s education, credentialing, and skill sets?

North Carolina law does not forbid employers from establishing tiers or levels of medical assistants. An employer is allowed to determine what elements of knowledge and skill are required for each category of medical assistants and what tasks should be assigned to medical assistants in the respective categories.

However, these levels should not have “CMA” in their titles. The American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) has intellectual property rights to the phrase “certified medical assistant” and the initialisms “CMA (AAMA)” and “CMA.”

Titling these classifications as Medical Assistant I, II, III is permitted under North Carolina law and does not infringe on the trademark and intellectual property rights of the AAMA. See the State Scope of Practice Laws webpage on the AAMA website to access key state legislative materials pertaining to medical assisting.

Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential

Can LPNs Take the CMA (AAMA) Exam?

I field many questions from health professionals with a variety of educational and professional backgrounds about the eligibility requirements for the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination. Many wonder, If I have this knowledge and experience, am I eligible to take the CMA (AAMA) Exam? If you are one such person, consider this question and response:

I am a licensed practical nurse (LPN). Would it be possible for me to take the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination? Some employers in my area prefer to hire CMAs (AAMA) rather than LPNs.

This is my response:

Only graduates of CAAHEP- or ABHES-accredited medical assisting programs are eligible for the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination. I suggest that you contact CAAHEP- and ABHES-accredited medical assisting programs in your areas and see whether they would accept some of the courses you took in your LPN program in lieu of similar courses in the medical assisting program.

Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential, Scope of Practice

Can CMAs (AAMA) Be Ophthalmic Technicians, and Vice Versa?

Often the questions I receive from CMAs (AAMA) are as versatile as the health professionals asking them. Although some questions focus on an individual’s specific circumstance, they present a situation all CMAs (AAMA) with certification questions can learn something from. The following question is one such case:

I would like to know if a CMA (AAMA) is permitted to work at the office of an ophthalmologist as an ophthalmic technician and be able to continue to hold and recertify the CMA (AAMA) credential.

The answer to your question is yes. One of the many advantages of the CMA (AAMA) is the variety of professional opportunities that are available. CMAs (AAMA) work in the offices of ophthalmologists in various capacities.

The Certifying Board of the AAMA places no restrictions on the types of positions CMAs (AAMA) must hold in order to be eligible to recertify. You are permitted to work as an ophthalmic technician and recertify your CMA (AAMA) by continuing education or retesting.

Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential, Professional Identity, Uncategorized

“Registered” vs. “Certified”: A Question of Terminology

A common source of confusion within medical assisting is the question of whether medical assisting credentials with “registered” in the name are superior to medical assisting credentials with “certified” in the name.

The answer to this question is no. National medical assisting credentials with the word “registered” as part of the credential name are not of a higher level status than medical assisting credentials with “certified” in their name.

This confusion may be engendered by the fact that “registered” indicates licensed status for credentials in fields other than medical assisting.  For example, in professional nursing, a “registered nurse” is a nurse who has met state educational and testing requirements, and is licensed to practice professional nursing.

However, this is not the case in medical assisting.  A medical assistant with a credential that has “registered” in its title is not in a different or higher legal category than a medical assistant with a credential that has “certified” in its title.

In fact, CMA (AAMA) certification has rigorous college-level education requirements, physician-quality exam standards, and is nationally and globally accredited, unlike other certifications and registrations.

Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential, On the Job, Professional Identity

Updated Requirements for Medical Assistants in South Dakota

Under South Dakota law, medical assistants are governed jointly by the Board of Medical and Osteopathic Examiners and the Board of Nursing. Medical assistants must meet the requirements and register with the South Dakota Board of Medical and Osteopathic Examiners in order to work as a medical assistant.

As of October 20, 2016, the joint rules of the two South Dakota boards now require medical assistants to have “passed a national certifying exam approved by the boards.” For 20 years the rules have required medical assistants to have “graduated from a medical assisting program approved by the boards.” Note the following addition, emphasized below, to the joint rules:

20:84:03:01. Qualifications of applicants. An applicant for registration shall provide:

  1. Proof of graduation from a medical assistant program approved by the boards;
  2. Proof of good moral character;
  3. Proof the applicant has graduated from high school or passed a standard equivalency test;
  4. Documentation showing the applicant is at least 18 years of age; and
  5. Proof of having passed a national certifying exam approved by the boards.

20:84:04:01. Approved education programs. An applicant for registration shall have graduated from a medical assistant program that is approved by the boards or accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), or a similar accrediting institution approved by the United States Department of Education. Approved programs must provide classroom, laboratory, and clinical learning experiences that provide for student attainment of entry level competence as a registered medical assistant.