Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential, Scope of Practice

Can CMAs (AAMA) Be Ophthalmic Technicians, and Vice Versa?

Often the questions I receive from CMAs (AAMA) are as versatile as the health professionals asking them. Although some questions focus on an individual’s specific circumstance, they present a situation all CMAs (AAMA) with certification questions can learn something from. The following question is one such case:

I would like to know if a CMA (AAMA) is permitted to work at the office of an ophthalmologist as an ophthalmic technician and be able to continue to hold and recertify the CMA (AAMA) credential.

The answer to your question is yes. One of the many advantages of the CMA (AAMA) is the variety of professional opportunities that are available. CMAs (AAMA) work in the offices of ophthalmologists in various capacities.

The Certifying Board of the AAMA places no restrictions on the types of positions CMAs (AAMA) must hold in order to be eligible to recertify. You are permitted to work as an ophthalmic technician and recertify your CMA (AAMA) by continuing education or retesting.

On the Job, Scope of Practice

Scope of Practice With Nurse Practitioners

I have been receiving an increasing number of questions about the scope of practice for medical assistants when they are working under the supervision of nurse practitioners (NPs) or physician assistants (PAs), and not under the direct supervision of a physician. This scenario will become more frequent because of the Affordable Care Act and the anticipated increase in demand for primary care, which is often provided by NPs and PAs.

Because physician assistants always work under physician authority and supervision—although, in some states, very general physician supervision—the scope of practice for medical assistants working under PAs is usually very similar to their scope of practice when working under physician supervision. However, there are some state laws that do not permit medical assistants to administer medication unless a physician (MD) or osteopath (DO) is on the premises.

Medical assistants’ scope of practice when working under nurse practitioners (or other advanced practice nurses) is usually more difficult to ascertain from state law. The controlling law is the state nurse practice act and the regulations and policies of the state board of nursing. Often, the legal analysis is complicated.

If you work under the direct supervision of a nurse practitioner or a physician assistant and have questions about scope of practice, please feel free to direct your questions to me.