medication aide, medication assistant, Scope of Practice

CMAs (AAMA), CNAs, and Medication Aides

I recently received the following question:

Does the law permit a CMA (AAMA) to work as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) in a nursing home without meeting the state requirements for registering as a CNA?

The answer is no. A medical assistant—even a CMA (AAMA) who has graduated from a programmatically accredited medical assisting program—must meet the state requirements for CNAs and register with the state as a CNA in order to perform clinical tasks in a skilled nursing facility or other inpatient settings.

Some states have a category of “medication aides (or assistants).” Medication aides are permitted to distribute medications to patients in an inpatient setting, usually under registered nurse authority and supervision. CMAs (AAMA) must also meet state requirements in order to work as a medication aide.

For more discussion on this topic, read my previous blog post “Medical Assistants and Medication Aides/Assistants/Technicians: Differences and Clarifications.”

On the Job, Scope of Practice

Medical Assistants in Camping Settings

I recently received the following question:

I was wondering whether medical assistants in my state are eligible to become overnight camp health officers and whether we are allowed to give intramuscular and subcutaneous injections as needed. No health care provider would be physically present. However, one or more providers (e.g., physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) would be available by phone.

Under the laws of your state, medical assistants are not permitted to serve as camp health officers when no licensed health care provider is present and immediately available. This is because health professionals in a camping setting may be called upon to deal with situations that require the making of immediate clinical assessment and evaluations and the exercise of independent clinical judgments. Medical assistants are not taught the knowledge and skills necessary to function in this capacity.

Medical assistants are permitted to assist licensed health care providers in a camping environment, however.

delegation, Medicare, On the Job, Scope of Practice

The Role of Medical Assistants in the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit

The role of medical assistants—especially CMAs (AAMA)—in the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) continues to be a topic of interest and inquiry for health care professionals. The latest Public Affairs article attempts to clarify what AWV tasks are and are not delegable to medical assistants. Read “The Role of Medical Assistants in the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit” in the July/August 2018 issue of CMA Today on the AAMA website.

Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential

Can LPNs Take the CMA (AAMA) Exam?

I field many questions from health professionals with a variety of educational and professional backgrounds about the eligibility requirements for the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination. Many wonder, If I have this knowledge and experience, am I eligible to take the CMA (AAMA) Exam? If you are one such person, consider this question and response:

I am a licensed practical nurse (LPN). Would it be possible for me to take the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination? Some employers in my area prefer to hire CMAs (AAMA) rather than LPNs.

This is my response:

Only graduates of CAAHEP- or ABHES-accredited medical assisting programs are eligible for the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination. I suggest that you contact CAAHEP- and ABHES-accredited medical assisting programs in your areas and see whether they would accept some of the courses you took in your LPN program in lieu of similar courses in the medical assisting program.

delegation, Medicare, On the Job, Scope of Practice

Medical Assistants and the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit

There seems to be some confusion about what a medical assistant is permitted to do in connection with a Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV). Let’s start with a description of a Medicare AWV from the May/June 2015 CMA Today article “Prioritizing Prevention: Medicare’s Annual Wellness Visit”:

The yearly wellness visit provides seniors with a general health-risk assessment that includes screenings for depression, cognitive impairment, and other health concerns. At the visit, health care providers review the patient’s medical and family history, docu­ment vital measurements, such as height, weight, and blood pressure, and update lists of current providers and prescriptions. At the conclusion of the visit, the patient is provided with a personal health plan, including a long-term schedule for future screenings and preventive services.

Note the following document from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), “The ABCs of the Annual Wellness Visit”:

Medicare Part B covers an AWV if performed by a:

  • Physician (a doctor of medicine or osteopathy)
  • Qualified non-physician practitioner (a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or certified clinical nurse specialist)
  • Medical professional (including a health educator, registered dietitian, nutrition professional, or other licensed practitioner) or a team of medical professionals who are directly supervised by a physician (doctor of medicine or osteopathy)

It is my legal opinion that federal law permits medical assistants to assist licensed health care providers (e.g., MDs/DOs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) in the performing of an AWV. However, medical assistants are not permitted to perform any part of the AWV that requires the medical assistant to make independent clinical judgments or to make clinical assessments or evaluations.