Scribes Not Permitted to Enter Orders for Meaningful Use

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently issued an important clarification regarding meaningful use order entry. See the following quote from a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmologists:

EHR Meaningful Use Update: CMS Comes Out Against Scribes
Despite Academy efforts, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services clarified this week that medical scribes − even those who are certified − are not permitted to enter electronic medication, laboratory, or radiology orders into electronic health record systems. The Academy believes that changes to the criteria for satisfying the EHR Meaningful Use Program’s Computerized Provider Order Entry measure lacked clarity regarding appropriate personnel who may perform this task.

In communication to the Academy, CMS explained that it is not permitting scribes to enter medical data under the CPOE measure. Medical staff entering orders into EHRs for purposes of satisfying the CPOE measure must be, at minimum, a certified medical assistant or equivalent, which includes certified ophthalmic technicians, certified ophthalmic technologists, and certified ophthalmic assistants.

About Donald Balasa

Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA, chief executive officer and legal counsel for the American Association of Medical Assistants, keeps his eye on what is happening in the profession.
This entry was posted in Certification and the CMA (AAMA) Credential, Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE), On the Job and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Scribes Not Permitted to Enter Orders for Meaningful Use

  1. Jessica Burkybile, MSN, RN-BC, CPN says:

    The scribe job description at my organization requires proof that the interested candidate is a credentialed (certified/registered) medical assistant. Glad we made this part of the job requirements as we add more scribe positions in the organization.

  2. Kathy Wautlet says:

    KK~ Not sure if this is of any interest?

    I thought there was some discussion a (long?) while back about scribes.

    Do with this as you wish.

    K~

    Kathy Wautlet, RN, BSN Safety, Risk, Infection Prevention, Peer Review Coordinator, BMG/BSG 2020 So Webster Ave Green Bay, WI 54301 920-445-7224 office kmvand@bellin.org (best)

  3. Sheryl Bueno CMA (AAMA) says:

    What is the status of a certified podiatric medical assistant in regard to CMS rulings and order entry?

  4. Melissa says:

    Certified? What about the R word? (Registered)

  5. marilyn jefferis says:

    Ok what about cna’s?

  6. Grace Vandyne says:

    I am so happy to see this action taken. As a CMA (AAMA) I have formal education, and training. My credentials are valid. Employers should recognize that as a CMA I am versatile and able to perform clinical and administrative duties. We deserve to be recognized, we have earned it through hard work, dedication, and perseverance.
    I am proud to be a Certified Medical Assistant.

  7. Jo says:

    Thank you SO very much for entering this. I have been a CMA for 25 years. I will soon retire, but it is wonderful that we are finally getting the recognition we deserve! I NEVER wanted to be in health care, daughter of a Surgeon, required to work in his office five days a week after school, vacations, summer breaks, being idle is the biggest sin then. I went on with my first seven years at Federal health Care Facilities, Indexing (what we called recording and alpha-numerically sequencing research and report summaries for physicians in VA, SSA, etc.) I naturally knew binary, Federal, Fed Dept, Fed Division, Sub-division, Agency, probably touched 30 reams of paper a day. Some was by hand, in 1980 actually had first introduction to a computer. I typed 92 words a minute and have synergistic dyslexia, so I actually liked the old “Teletype” with a tickertape in full binary better. Computers made too many mistakes then, they were “new”. But, by 1984, CMS (then HCFA) required all physicians offices code their own claims. No one knew what to do, so we formed a network. It was so easy for me, but I had difficulty with some of the terminology. I went back to school at night, sat for the CMA. I eventually acquired my CPC, became a coding instructor, grant writer participant, in 2009 sat and gained my CPMA…as professional auditor. Your clinical skills are important, but you will always have competition with them, as they only advance at a snail’s pace. Administrative and General training, right now, is from what see, junk. There isn’t valid individualized andragogal situation based assessment resulting in an individualized scope specific training. I’ve been trying for years, but, the Corp Practice of Medicine hates to see me coming. As a CMA make sure you stay current, you could be in real demand if you hone your administrative skills.

  8. Crystal says:

    What is difference between CMA&CCMA?

  9. i truly appreciate this article very good submit this actually answered my drawback thanks here is a superb weblog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s