Q and A: Medical Assistants and CPOE, Part 2 (Post 5 of 5)

Because most CMAs (AAMA) work under the direct supervision of “eligible professionals” (as defined in the rules of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS]), this post focuses on some common questions surrounding the provisions of the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Program that are applicable to eligible professionals, not those provisions that are applicable to “eligible hospitals” and “critical access hospitals.”

Q: Do medical assistants have to be credentialed to enter medication, laboratory, and radiology orders into the EHR if such entry is not being counted toward meeting the measure for the Core Objective “CPOE for Medication, Laboratory, and Radiology Orders”?

A: No. There is no other CMS regulation, federal law, or state law that requires medical assistants to be credentialed as a prerequisite for entering orders into the Electronic Health Record if such entry is not being counted toward meeting the Stage 1 and Stage 2 percentage requirements for entering orders into the CPOE. In other words, the absolute legal requirement is that medical assistants be credentialed (as defined in the CMS final rule) when entering orders for calculating compliance with the “CPOE for Medication, Laboratory, and Radiology Orders” Core Objective.

Q (part 1 of 2): When does the CMS final rule allowing credentialed medical assistants to enter orders into the CPOE go into effect?

Q (part 2 of 2): Does the CMS final rule only apply to entry of orders under Stage 2 of the Incentive Program?
Note the following answer to CMS FAQ 7693:

We [CMS] have revised the description of who can enter orders into the EHR and have it count as CPOE and have it count for purposes of the CPOE measure. This revision is available for EHR reporting periods in 2013 and beyond regardless of what stage of meaningful use the provider is attesting to. [Emphasis added.]

A (part 1 of 2): The CMS rule allowing credentialed medical assistants to enter medication, laboratory, and radiology orders into the computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system is in effect for reporting periods in 2013. It is not correct to assert that the CMS rule does not go into effect until 2014.

A (part 2 of 2): The above CMS FAQ clearly states that the rule allowing credentialed medical assistants to enter orders into the CPOE applies to all stages of the Medicare and Medicaid Incentive Program. Thus, it applies to Stage 1 as well as Stage 2, and will apply to Stage 3 when it goes into effect.

About Donald A. Balasa

Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA, chief executive officer and legal counsel for the American Association of Medical Assistants, keeps his eye on what is happening in the profession.
This entry was posted in Scope of Practice and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

47 Responses to Q and A: Medical Assistants and CPOE, Part 2 (Post 5 of 5)

  1. Bobbie says:

    I am employed at a facility where we are partcipating with CMS and joint comission . I am a CMA AAMA . My employer has recently taken my CMA off my pay check as well as my ID tag. They also employ medical assistants (not certified) and have awarded them with a credential of MA . We all have the same job duties, (EHR,escribing, lab testing in office etc. and are under
    constant scrutiny about “meaningful use”. I brought this whole issue of the new ruling and I was told it is not an issue in Michigan . Is this true? We have many CMAs but have many medical assistants non certified as well . Unfortunately there is no differentiation here.

    • Thank you for your question. I am happy to respond.

      The decision by CMS regarding only “credentialed medical assistants” being allowed to enter medication, laboratory, and radiology orders into the electronic health record for purposes of calculating meaningful use under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Program is federal law and applies to any eligible provider (EP) who is participating in the Incentive Program.

      Feel free to forward any of my articles on this. Also, I would be happy to speak with anyone about this.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

    • Bea says:

      Hi Bobbie-
      I’ve been working as a Certified Medical Assistant for almost ten years now at the same office. I was very forturnate that I was hired out of my externship and have been able to maintain my certification withe the AAMA. Although I am the the only medical assistant with a certification by the AAMA and have been ther the longest out of all the MA’s that are there-I seem to get passed up for many opportunites and yes-we do have a very bright young lady that works with us who has been to nursing school, but has not obtained her nursing degree and does not appear that she has any aspirations to do so which is fine, but she does work as an MA and is very much quilified, but in the two years she’s been with our office she has been on hiring commities, and just an all-around part of anything she can be in our office while I feel that all my credentlals are not even recongnized-It can be extreamely discouraging, and sometimes down right demeaning. Why do I stay? Maybe your wondering-well, because inspite of all of this, I do very much enjoy where I am, but I do wish that our credentials did matter to our employers…In saying this; I would like to close this by expressing the pride and accomplishment I feel when I can say that I am part of the AAMA because I do believe it is something significant, and even if it dosen’t matter to my employers, it does to me-Medical Assisting is my vocation and I plan on doing this for years to come, and I believe that the AAMA plays a significant roll in helping me be a better medical assistant and that should be appreciated…So hang in the Bobbie, there a fellow CMA (AAMA)’s out there in the trenches that know what your going through.

      bea…

  2. Annie says:

    I was trained on the job by an MD and FNP, no MA schooling, which makes me ineligible to take the CMA test. But, I can be eligible to take the RMA test with recommendation letters. Since there is no differentation between RMA and CMA, would becoming an RMA meet the requirement?

    • Thank you for your question. The following is from a staff member of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services:

      Q: In order to meet the objective for computerized order entry (CPOE) for the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs, do medical assistants need a specific kind of credential from a specific organization to be considered credentialed and therefore able to enter orders using CPOE that can count in the numerator of the measure?

      A: A credentialed medical assistant is a medical assistant who has received credentials or otherwise been certified by an organization other than the employing organization to perform duties as a medical assistant. CMS does not specify credentialing organizations that would qualify medical assistants under this definition. Medical assistants who are credentialed, certified, licensed, or otherwise affirmed as medical assistants by an organization other than the one which employees them can enter orders for the purpose of this objective.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  3. Thoma says:

    Since both Stage 1 and Stage 2 always refer to state, local, and professional guidelines, a state’s definition of a licensed healthcare professional would always trump the federal register? My state seems to be extremely liberal and include individuals where CPOE could be included in the job description and hence inside their scope of duties which would then be acceptable to our state.
    Thanks

    • Thank you for your question. The gist of the CMS rule is that licensed health professionals and “credentialed medical assistants” are permitted to enter orders into the computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system if state law permits. I am not aware of any state law that forbids physicians (and physician assistants and nurse practitioners) from delegating to medical assistants entry of orders into the electronic health record. Therefore, I would not agree with your statement that state law trumps the CMS provisions.

      I hope this is helpful. Please let me know whether I have properly understood your point.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  4. Lisa Gall says:

    Your posts have been very informative. I would like to point out that Minnesota does have specific language on what a prescription is and who can generate a prescription. If a state law requires a higher standard, it should be followed. That said, there is nothing that states a CMA (or a nurse) can’t transcribe an order. However, transcribing orders is another risk area for medical mistakes and/or omissions and should be used minimally. The CMS intent is to promote patient safety and decrease errors.

    These excerpts are from the MN Board of Nursing document: Nurses and Prescribing: FAQ
    The content of this document is based on Minnesota Statutes sections 148.171, subdivision 16, 148.235, 151.01, subdivisions 16 and 23, and 151.37, subdivision 2(a).

    What is prescribing?
    The basis for prescribing is in both Minnesota nursing and pharmacy law. The Nurse Practice Act provides that prescribing includes generating a prescription for the preparation of, use of, or manner of using a drug.

    Who may prescribe?
    Doctors of medicine, osteopathy, and optometry; podiatrists; veterinarians; physician assistants; and advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) are legally authorized prescribers.

    May a nurse, who is not an APRN, prescribe?
    No. Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered nurses (RNs) may not prescribe and may not:

    Write the drug, dosage and directions for use on a prescription form that has been presigned by an authorized prescriber;

    Sign or stamp an authorized prescriber’s name on a prescription form followed by the nurse’s signature or initials; or

    Call a prescription, including a prescription to refill/extend a prescription, to a pharmacy that has not originated with an authorized prescriber for a specific patient or client.

    May a nurse, who is not an APRN, renew a prescription without consulting the prescriber?
    No. Renewing/refilling/extending a prescription/order is considered originating a prescription.

    May an LPN receive, transcribe, and transmit verbal and telephone prescription orders?
    Receiving telephone and verbal prescription orders, transcribing, and transmitting prescription orders are activities often performed by nurses and appropriately included by many organizations in the responsibilities of LPNs.

    LPNs have the skill and knowledge to receive a prescription order and transcribe it accurately for other nurses to implement or transmit it to a pharmacist to dispense.

    Performing the activity of transcription is NOT considered delegating to others.

    There are other FAQ related to protocols, and Minnesota statutes allows nurses to fill meds based on protocols, with very specific rules on who, what and when.

    This FAQ document is available at:
    http://mn.gov/health-licensing-boards/images/NURSES_AND_PRESCRIBING.pdf

  5. Sharon Rosario says:

    Does a Registered Medical Assistant comply with the credentials needed for the CMS/Medicare criteria? Or do we need to take the Certification test?

    • Thank you for your question. Please see the attached, especially the following excerpt:
      A: A credentialed medical assistant is a medical assistant who has received credentials or otherwise been certified by an organization other than the employing organization to perform duties as a medical assistant. CMS does not specify credentialing organizations that would qualify medical assistants under this definition. Medical assistants who are credentialed, certified, licensed, or otherwise affirmed as medical assistants by an organization other than the one which employees them can enter orders for the purpose of this objective.

      The RMA(AMT) falls within the above definition. Therefore, RMAs(AMT) are “credentialed medical assistants” under the CMS rule and you don’t have to take another test in order for you to enter orders into the EHR and have it count toward meaningful use under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

      • Linda says:

        Does graduating as an MA from a college with a diploma, or an AA degree qualify as “or otherwise affirmed as medical assistants by an organization other than the one which employees them can enter orders for the purpose of this objective.”

      • Thank you for your question. It is my legal opinion that a certificate, diploma, or associate degree in medical assisting does not meet the CMS definition of “credentialed medical assisting.” Note the following excerpt from my article in the July-August 2013 issue of CMA Today:
        Does an associate degree, certificate,
        or diploma from an academic medical
        assisting program fall within the CMS
        definition of a medical assisting
        credential?
        In my opinion, the context of the August
        23, 2012 CMS final rule does not allow an
        associate degree, certificate, or diploma
        from a medical assisting program to be
        considered a medical assisting credential.

        I hope this is helpful.

        Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
        Executive Director, Legal Counsel

        American Association of Medical Assistants
        Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

        Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

        The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  6. Stephanie Scale says:

    Good day , I just graduated from MA school in NY. Can I take AAMA exam in GA.

    • Thank you for your question. If you just graduated from a CAAHEP or ABHES accredited medical assisting program in any part of the United States, you are eligible to take the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination in any part of the United States.

      The CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination is a national examination. It is not a state examination that is different in every state.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  7. Is there only 1 certification that allows Medical Assistants the ability to enter orders in to the computer system?

    • No. Please note the following:
      Q: In order to meet the objective for computerized order entry (CPOE) for the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs, do medical assistants need a specific kind of credential from a specific organization to be considered credentialed and therefore able to enter orders using CPOE that can count in the numerator of the measure?

      A: A credentialed medical assistant is a medical assistant who has received credentials or otherwise been certified by an organization other than the employing organization to perform duties as a medical assistant. CMS does not specify credentialing organizations that would qualify medical assistants under this definition. Medical assistants who are credentialed, certified, licensed, or otherwise affirmed as medical assistants by an organization other than the one which employees them can enter orders for the purpose of this objective.

      How does CMS define “credentialed
      medical assistants”?
      According to the 2012 CMS document
      cited immediately above, “Credentialing
      for a medical assistant must come from an
      organization other than the organization
      employing the medical assistant.” That
      is, a clinic or health system cannot give a
      “credential” to its medical assistants and
      argue successfully that such a “credential”
      meets the CMS requirements.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262  |  Fax: 312/899-1259  |  http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook  

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  8. Stacey says:

    When you say “enter an order” does this mean who eventually signs the order? For instance at my clinic medical assistants that are not certified are allowed to enter a medication order but it gets routed to the provider for signature. Does that count for the CMS rule?

    • Thank you for your question. I am happy to respond.

      According to the CMS rule, only “credentialed medical assistants” (including CMAs (AAMA)), as well as licensed health care professionals, are permitted to enter medication, laboratory, and radiology orders into the EHR and have such entry count toward meeting the meaningful use thresholds under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs.

      According to Robert Anthony of CMS, as he stated in his joint presentation with me at the 2013 AAMA Annual Conference in Atlanta in September, the fact that a health care provider reviews, approves, and attest to/signs the order does not eliminate the requirement that only “credentialed medical assistants” (or licensed professionals) are permitted to enter the order into the CPOE system.

      You can listen to the videos of our joint presentation to confirm this. The three brief video segments are available on the AAMA website.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  9. Leslie says:

    I work for an Independent Diagnostic Testing Facility (IDTF). We have a referring physician’s office that states the MA is sufficient to “electronically sign” the radiology order which is generated after the MA enters data into the EHR for CPOE. I am uncertain if an electronically signed order, by a MA, satisfies the IDTF rules for orders or if this only satisfies the rules for MU CPOE for the EP. Does the treating physician still need to sign the order for radiology services referred to the IDTF?

    • Thank you for your question. It is my legal opinion that the delegating/overseeing/supervising health care provider must review, approve, and attest/sign orders entered into the CPOE system by a medical assistant. It is my understanding that this applies under the laws of all states, and for all health care delivery settings.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

      • Kim Rich says:

        We are being told that Rn’s and Lpn’s can send order via cope directly to pharmacy ,lab and radiology then doctor consign but CMa AAMA can not doctor must sign before they can get medical care done. I am confused I thought we could carry out verbal orders from doctors. We are being really effected by this . Pt coming in to do labs are being sent home be a use doctor not in office to sign order ext. We live in Oregon. We don’t do anything without doctors order which usually lives in plan on ehr. Help please

  10. Tara says:

    Hello,
    I have an employee who is an MA but not certified. Her program does not have the proper accreditation for her to be able to sit for the AMAA certification. In NJ she may sit under NHA for certification. Does this matter to CMS or does it have to be AMAA certification?
    Thank you for your time!

    • Thank you for your question. CMS only requires that a medical assisting credential be awarded by a third party (not an employer) and that the credential requires the passing of a test.

      Sent from my iPhone

  11. Christopher says:

    I understand that non-certified MA’s cannot enter medication orders in an EHR but should they be populating the medication portion of the electronic record at all? That is, should they be documenting the medications in the EHR?

    • Thank you for your question. In our joint presentation at the 2013 House of Delegates in Atlanta last September, Robert Anthony of CMS makes it clear that “lay people” are permitted to enter demographic, financial, and objective medical information into the electronic health record, such as the list of medications for a patient. You can confirm this by listening to Mr. Anthony’s portion of the videos of our presentation, which are posted on our website.

      I hope this is helpful. Thank you again for your question.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  12. Sharon Rosario says:

    Does a Medical Assistant that is registered through the American Registry of Medical Assistants (ARMA) meet the credentialing requirements for Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) 2014 electronic order entry for meaningful use?

    • Thank you for your question. It is my legal opinion that having the R.M.A. credential given by the American Registry of Medical Assistants does not meet the CMS requirement because it does not require the taking and passing of an examination.

      In addition to the CMA (AAMA), the RMA(AMT), the NCMA of the NCCT, the CCMA of the NHA, and some other credentials do meet the CMS requirement of a “credentialed medical assistant.”

      CMS has stated that in-house credentials do not meet its definition of “credentialed medical assistant.” Because the ARMA R.M.A. accepts a statement by an employer that the medical assistant is a knowledgeable and competent medical assistant and does not require the passing of a test or the completion of any medical assisting education, I view the R.M.A.(ARMA) as the equivalent of an in-house credential.

      Here is the language from the CMS rule:
      Therefore, we finalize the more limited description of including credentialed medical assistants. The credentialing would have to be obtained from an organization other than the employing organization.

      I will send the CMS rule to your e-mail address.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  13. Leslie Koehler says:

    Is a medical assistant able to enter problems in the problem list of the EHR or can the problems only be entered by the provider? With them being able to put in orders through the CPOE they need to pull a problem from this list to link up with the lab etc. Do you know where I can find written documentation regarding this issue? Thank you.

    • Thank you for your question. It is my legal opinion that a medical assistant is permitted to enter verbatim into the EHR a problem list approved by the overseeing/delegating/supervising provider. I will send to your e-mail address a link to a video by CMS staff Robert Anthony and an excerpt from his presentation that will support my above conclusion.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  14. Kathleene says:

    I am working as a medical assistant for a Cardiology practice. I started working as a MA January 2014, with no MA “credential” and entering orders in EHR including medication refills . It wasnt until June 2014 that myself and other MA’s were required by the clinic to take this course; St Augustine School of Medical Assistants, (online) “accredited by NCAB”.
    It was not until recently that I realized that this course was not recognized by the AAMA and the “accreditation” was based on a “holistic approach to medicine” and this course has been warned by the AAMA as a “diploma mill”.
    My question is that, According to Florida law and CMS, is this course recognized as creating “credential medical assistants” even though the course’s accreditation is not recognized by the AAMA let alone the Council on Higher Education Accreditation or the U.S. Department of Education.
    *The above information was found online through separate sources.*
    I was required to purchase this course in order to work as a medical assistant at the clinic. After researching the program and informing my supervisor, I was told that by Florida law, and even with participation with CPOE AND CMS, that this course was sufficient.
    Is this accurate? Thank you?

    • Thank you for your question. Florida law does not require medical assistants to have medical assisting education or a credential. So you are permitted to work in Florida regardless of the nature of this course. In my opinion it would not satisfy the CMS definition of credentialed medical assistant. Don

      Sent from my iPhone

      • Kathleene says:

        Thank you for your response. If it does not satisfy the CMS definition of credentialed medical assistant, could that affect the company in regards to meeting CPOE/CMS stamdards (forgive me if I am not phrasing correctly)? Would this be risk for audit, especially since 5 medical assistants have taken this course.?

        Hope this makes sense. Still researching and trying to understand the regulations.

      • You are welcome. Yes it could affect reimbursement from the Medicare and Medicaid Incentive Programs. Please see my article from earlier this year regarding CMS audits. Don

        Sent from my iPhone

      • You are welcome. Yes, that could cause problems if you are audited by CMS. I will send some of my articles to your e-mail address.

        Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
        Executive Director, Legal Counsel

        American Association of Medical Assistants
        Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

        Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

        The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

    • Note the Florida medical assisting law:
      Title XXXII
      REGULATION OF PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS

      Chapter 458
      MEDICAL PRACTICE

      View Entire Chapter

      458.3485 Medical assistant.—
      (1) DEFINITION.—As used in this section, “medical assistant” means a professional multiskilled person dedicated to assisting in all aspects of medical practice under the direct supervision and responsibility of a physician. This practitioner assists with patient care management, executes administrative and clinical procedures, and often performs managerial and supervisory functions. Competence in the field also requires that a medical assistant adhere to ethical and legal standards of professional practice, recognize and respond to emergencies, and demonstrate professional characteristics.
      (2) DUTIES.—Under the direct supervision and responsibility of a licensed physician, a medical assistant may undertake the following duties:
      (a) Performing clinical procedures, to include:
      1. Performing aseptic procedures.
      2. Taking vital signs.
      3. Preparing patients for the physician’s care.
      4. Performing venipunctures and nonintravenous injections.
      5. Observing and reporting patients’ signs or symptoms.
      (b) Administering basic first aid.
      (c) Assisting with patient examinations or treatments.
      (d) Operating office medical equipment.
      (e) Collecting routine laboratory specimens as directed by the physician.
      (f) Administering medication as directed by the physician.
      (g) Performing basic laboratory procedures.
      (h) Performing office procedures including all general administrative duties required by the physician.
      (i) Performing dialysis procedures, including home dialysis.
      (3) CERTIFICATION.—Medical assistants may be certified by the American Association of Medical Assistants or as a Registered Medical Assistant by the American Medical Technologists.

      The above law does not require medical assistants to have formal medical assisting education to work in Florida.

      Because the St. Augustine medical assisting course is not recognized by the United States Department of Education, it is my opinion that it does not qualify a medical assistant as meeting the CMS definition of “credentialed medical assistant” for purposes of entering orders into the CPOE system and having such entry count toward meaningful use.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  15. Deborah says:

    Can rt enter cpoe ? They are lisc xray tech but not ma

  16. Lyn says:

    When does this rule go in effect, I work at a farely large group in Texas we specialize in ENT and Allergy.We are all MA’s But recently they said we need to take the certification exam before the end of the year to be able to continue to work EMR/Sign off/Create orders is this correct?.. sorry I hope you understand my question..Thank you

    • Thank you for your question. The CMS rule about only “credentialed medical assistants” (as well as licensed health care professionals) being able to enter orders into the CPOE system and have such entry count toward meaningful use under the Incentive Programs went into effect for reporting periods beginning January 1, 2013.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

      • Lyn says:

        When is the meaningful use mandotory?

      • Participating in the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs is not mandatory, even though there are considerable financial disincentives for not participating. Please note the following excerpt from my July-August 2013 Public Affairs article in CMA Today:
        Are these programs mandatory?
        In a sense, they are not. However, note
        the following from the CMS guide
        “An Introduction to the Medicare
        EHR Incentive Program for Eligible
        Professionals”:
        Medicare eligible professionals who do
        not meet the requirements for meaningful
        use by 2015 and in each subsequent year
        are subject to payment adjustments to
        their Medicare reimbursements that start
        at 1 percent per year, up to a maximum
        5 percent annual adjustment.

        I hope this is helpful.

        Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
        Executive Director, Legal Counsel

        American Association of Medical Assistants
        Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

        Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

        The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

  17. Holly Shinn says:

    Hi Don:
    I have an applicant for a scribe who is a Registered Radiologic Tech. Because of this she has been accredited to work in clinics. Would she be qualified to work as a scribe and enter CPOE?
    Also, would you know that with her AART, would she be able to test out and become a registered Medical Assistant?

    • Thank you for your question, Holly. Registered Radiologic Technologists are permitted to enter orders into the CPOE system for meaningful use calculation purposes under the Medicare and Medicaid Incentive Programs.

      I do not know the details of the pathways for the RMA test of American Medical Technologists (AMT). I would suggest you review the AMT website to find an answer to this question.

      I hope this is helpful, Holly.

      Don

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Chief Executive Officer, Legal Counsel
      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org
      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional®

      [cid:image003.jpg@01CFF8F0.5DE79010] [cid:image007.jpg@01CFF8F0.5DE79010] [wordpress] [mail]

  18. Amanda K says:

    I worked for an organization (in Nebraska) that required last year that all CMA had to also take the medication aide course to continue working in the organization. The course was paid by the organization, however I have since left that organization and moved to another. My current employer now does not allow any one who is not a licensed care provider to refill medications in EHR. What can I do to show my employeer that CMA have the capibility to handle this responsiblity. It seems like a step back and a lack of support from my employeer.

  19. Mary Ehmig says:

    I have been working as an MA for 9 years. My employer now wants all ma’s to become certified by taking the RMA. I have been told that because I have not worked full time , it was not offered to me, that I cannot sit for the RMA EXAM. Any help from you is much appreciated .

  20. ashley says:

    Can an LPN enter orders and have the orders count for meaningful use?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s