Minor Errors, Major Corrections

Some of the most time-consuming work at the AAMA involves seeking out—and more importantly, correcting—the misinformation about the association and the profession. Seemingly minor errors can spread far and wide, so fixing them is a priority of the AAMA. This misinformation pops up all over the country:

  • At the request of Cori Burns, CMA (AAMA), a leader of the California Society of Medical Assistants, I contacted a school that was stating on its website that medical assisting graduates who pass the test given by the California Certifying Board for Medical Assistants (a private sector body, despite its name) become Certified Medical Assistants. In response to my e-mail, the school quickly agreed to rectify this error.
  • Nikal Redwine, CMA (AAMA), and other leaders of the Georgia State Society of Medical Assistants contacted me and asked for my assistance in regard to erroneous information about the CMA (AAMA) Certification Examination in Licensed and Certified Occupations in Georgia, published by the Georgia Department of Labor. I sent an October 15, 2010 letter to the Commissioner of Labor to rectify the problems.

These are only two examples of the errors and omissions that arise in all 50 states. But, it takes the vigilance of all our dedicated members to catch and correct these minor errors before they become major problems. If you find any such errors in your state or city, speak up!

About Donald A. Balasa

Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA, executive director and legal counsel for the American Association of Medical Assistants, keeps his eye on what is happening in the profession.
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2 Responses to Minor Errors, Major Corrections

  1. Carol Glascock APNP says:

    when a medical assistant is neglecting to document properly after being reminded repeatedly what recourse to you have for discipline

    • Thank you your question.

      Only medical assistants who hold the CMA (AAMA) credential are subject to the Disciplinary Standards of the Certifying Board of the AAMA. CMAs (AAMA) who act illegally or unethically can be disciplined under the Standards. The Disciplinary Standards are found on the AAMA website.

      The Certifying Board does not have jurisdiction over medical assistants who do not hold the CMA (AAMA) credential. If these individual hold a different medical assisting credential, they may be subject to disciplinary action by the certifying body that awarded the other credential.

      I hope this is helpful. Please let us know how we can be of further assistance.

      Donald A. Balasa, JD, MBA
      Executive Director, Legal Counsel

      American Association of Medical Assistants
      Ph: 800/228-2262 | Fax: 312/899-1259 | http://www.aama-ntl.org

      Visit us on Facebook! http://www.aama-ntl.org/facebook

      The CMA (AAMA): Health Care’s Most Versatile Professional

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